Monday, March 28, 2005

010 Sound in Space: Cloze Test and Crossword Puzzle

Please click here for a Cloze Test on Sound in Space. If you send me an email, I'll be quite happy to send you a crossword about this topic. Please put '010 Sound in Space: Crossword Puzzle' in the Subject line.

Sunday, March 27, 2005

009 Sound in Space: HotSpots and Advanced VocabBox

sound
space
outer space
spaceship whizzed past
engines are roaring
explodes
vibrates
rocket engine
sound moves through air
hear a sound

008 Sound in Space: HotSpots and Intermediate VocabBox and Glossary and Vocabulary Double-Check

sound: rocket #1 rocket #2 rocket #3
space: the region beyond the earth's atmosphere
outer space: the region beyond the earth's atmosphere where the Solar System is and all the Galaxies are
spaceship whizzed past: the spaceship came towards us and then went away with a loud humming or buzzing sound
pretend: act as if something were true; make belief as in a play
engines are roaring: they are making a very loud, deep and harsh noise
spaceship zooms past: it flies away with an unbelievably high speed
laser weapons: different magic swords and guns used in science fiction
explodes: it goes through a violent chemical reaction accompanied by heat, light, a shockwave, and loud noise > explosion > explosion #2
thunderous BOOM: an extremely loud, deafening explosion > thunder
vibrates: all sounds from the tiny whisper to the roar of a jet plane are vibrations which travel through air, reach your ear, and we hear as sound
rocket engine: in this engine a fuel is burning very fast, the hot gases are leaving through a narrow nozzle, and are producing a thrust [pushing force]
air particles: oxigen and nitrogen molecules
to move through: in this context it means that sound travels only through materials [gases, or liquids, or solid materials]; this shows a basic difference between light and sound
sound moves through air: a vibrating solid material passes some of the energy to gas molecules and the vibtation travels through the air
hear a sound: sense the vibration of a source through the air with the ears [sensation], and the brain reads it as sound [perception]

So far so good. Now let's see the same vocabulary explanation together with the original text. Please click here for the GLOSSARY.

Now that you know everything about the topic, it is high time to test your vocabulary. Please click here for a DOUBLE-CHECK.

007 Sound in Space: Text and HotSpots

Sound in Space

K: Hey Ed, what would it sound like if you were in outer space and a spaceship whizzed past you ?
E: Well, Kathy, maybe something like this!
K: Nope! Sorry, trick question. It wouldn't make any sound at all. The explanation -- after this on Kids' Earth and Sky!


K: This is Kids' Earth and Sky. Say! Let's pretend you're watching a movie that takes place in outer space.
E: The engines are roaring as a spaceship zooms past! Laser weapons are firing! The spaceship explodes with a thunderous BOOM! Wowza -- what a great movie!
K: Er, well, there's just one problem here.
E: What's that?
K: There's no sound in outer space. To have sound, you have to have a source that vibrates back and forth -- say, a rocket engine. As the engine fires, it shakes and vibrates and pushes all the little air particles around it.
E: I get it. And your ears are so sensitive that they pick up the changes in air pressure -- made by the pushing of the air particles. So, in order to hear a sound, you need something that vibrates, and ears to pick up those vibrations. But wait -- there's more! You also need something for the sound to move through -- like air.
K: Right. Picture a row of dominoes. Push over the first domino, and it pushes over the next one, and the next one, and so on. That's what it's like when sound moves through air.
E: But in space, there's no air -- so there's nothing for sound to move through. And that's why you wouldn't hear a sound in outer space.
K: That's today's show, made possible by the National Science Foundation. You'll hear about everything on the Earth...
E: And in the sky...
K: On Kids' Earth and Sky!
Author(s): Byrd & Block Communications
Please let us know what you think!
© 1980 Byrd & Block Communications Inc. Permission to use, copy and distribute these materials without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice appear in all copies and the materials are not redistributed for profit.

006 Sound in Space: Sound and Text

Sound in Space
Please click here to LISTEN

K: Hey Ed, what would it sound like if you were in outer space and a spaceship whizzed past you ? Please click here to view PICTURE
E: Well, Kathy, maybe something like this!
K: Nope! Sorry, trick question. It wouldn't make any sound at all. The explanation -- after this on Kids' Earth and Sky!


K: This is Kids' Earth and Sky. Say! Let's pretend you're watching a movie that takes place in outer space.
E: The engines are roaring as a spaceship zooms past! Laser weapons are firing! The spaceship explodes with a thunderous BOOM! Wowza -- what a great movie!
K: Er, well, there's just one problem here.
E: What's that?
K: There's no sound in outer space. To have sound, you have to have a source that vibrates back and forth -- say, a rocket engine. As the engine fires, it shakes and vibrates and pushes all the little air particles around it.
E: I get it. And your ears are so sensitive that they pick up the changes in air pressure -- made by the pushing of the air particles. So, in order to hear a sound, you need something that vibrates, and ears to pick up those vibrations. But wait -- there's more! You also need something for the sound to move through -- like air.
K: Right. Picture a row of dominoes. Push over the first domino, and it pushes over the next one, and the next one, and so on. That's what it's like when sound moves through air.
E: But in space, there's no air -- so there's nothing for sound to move through. And that's why you wouldn't hear a sound in outer space.
K: That's today's show, made possible by the National Science Foundation. You'll hear about everything on the Earth...
E: And in the sky...
K: On Kids' Earth and Sky!
Author(s): Byrd & Block Communications
Please let us know what you think!
© 1980 Byrd & Block Communications Inc. Permission to use, copy and distribute these materials without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice appear in all copies and the materials are not redistributed for profit.

Monday, March 14, 2005

005 Thirsty Camels: Cloze Test and Crossword Puzzle

Please click here for a Cloze Test on Thirsty Camels. If you send me an email, I'll be quite happy to send you a crossword about this topic. Please put '005 Thirsty Camels: Crossword Puzzle' in the Subject line.

004 Thirsty Camels: HotSpots and Advanced VocabBox

camels camels' family tree bactrian camel dromedary
thirsty
hump
runs out of water
store fat
shrink
camel's fur
sweating
conserve
resting
huddle

heat flow
evaporates
slurp up
National Science Foundation

003 Thirsty Camels: HotSpots and Intermediate VocabBox and Glossary and Vocabulary Double-Check

camels: camel pictures more camel pictures large mammals that live in dry areas. The camel's hump is filled with fat. There are two kinds of camel: the dromedary, or Arabian camel, which has one hump, and the Bactrian camel, which has two humps. Both types are domesticated.
thirsty: you are thirsty when your mouth is dry and you want to drink a lot
hump: there are one or two big and round 'hills' on the camel's back and the camel stores fat in it. The fat is the fuel for the journeys and the camel's body can turn it into water, too.
runs out of water: has used up all the water he has had
store fat: the camel turns the extra food into fat and the hump is the store-room for the fat. You can imagine the hump as the tank with the fuel [fat] in it.
shrink: get much smaller than it was earlier
camel's fur: the camel has thick and strong wool
sweating: when you work hard, or run fast, your skin is wet and it cools down your body
conserve: keep energy for a later period when there is no food
resting: after a period of hard work now the animal is sleeping or lazying around
huddle: many camels crowd together in a small place to keep warm
heat flow: in cold nights the camels crowd together and warm each other and they do not lose too much heat
evaporates: the water turns into steam and disappears in the air
slurp up: eat or drink quickly and noisily
National Science Foundation: picture it is an independent federal agency [it does not belong to any one of the 50 states, but to the USA] at 4201 Wilson Bouleward, Arlington, Virginia, USA. The NSF supports the development of science and has about 5.5 billion USD every year.

So far so good. Now let's see the same vocabulary explanation together with the original text. Please click here for the GLOSSARY.

Now that you know everything about the topic, it is high time to test your vocabulary. Please click here for a DOUBLE-CHECK.

002 Thirsty Camels: Text and HotSpots

Thirsty Camels
Now please read the text and stop at HotSpots [that is words in read]. Try to give them a meaning in the text.

E: Hi there. We're Ed ...
K: And Kathy ...
E: Hosts of Kids' Earth and Sky
K: A camel can go for months without drinking any water.
E: So how can you tell if a camel is thirsty?
K: Look at its hump?
K: Nope. Thirsty camels -- up next -- on Kids' Earth and Sky.

K: This is Kathy.
E: And I'm Ed for Kids' Earth and Sky. Chelsea wants to know, "If a camel's hump is full of water, then what happens when the camel runs out of water? Does its hump look like a balloon that's lost its air?"
K: Chelsea, even a thirsty camel can still have a hump -- as long as the camel isn't hungry, too. Camels store fat in their humps, not water. When a camel goes without food long enough, its hump will shrink and finally disappear!
E: Camels store water in all parts of their bodies, just like you and me, Chelsea. And their bodies are made to hold on to that water. For example, a camel's fur keeps it from sweating too much. Also, camels conserve their water. When they're resting, camels tend to huddle in groups. That's because there's less heat flow between two camels than between a camel and the air -- so less water evaporates!
K: Camels can go for more than half a year in the desert without drinking water. But, a very thirsty camel can slurp up more than enough water to fill up your bathtub!
E: Chelsea, thanks for your question. The National Science Foundation helps make our show possible. You'll hear about everything on the Earth . . .
K: And in the sky . . .
E: On Kids' Earth and Sky!

Author(s): Beverly Wachtel, Marc Airhart, Deborah Byrd

Please let us know what you think!

© 1980 Byrd & Block Communications Inc. Permission to use, copy and distribute these materials without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice appear in all copies and the materials are not redistributed for profit.

Friday, February 11, 2005

001 Thirsty Camels: Sound and Text

Thirsty Camels
Please click here to LISTEN

E: Hi there. We're Ed ...

K: And Kathy ...
E: Hosts of Kids' Earth and Sky
K: A camel can go for months without drinking any water.
E: So how can you tell if a camel is thirsty?
K: Look at its hump?
K: Nope. Thirsty camels -- up next -- on Kids' Earth and Sky.

Bobby Sanchez, St. Marys, KS Age: 9. "Cactus and camel looking for water." Using: "colored pencils." Please click here to view PICTURE

K: This is Kathy.
E: And I'm Ed for Kids' Earth and Sky. Chelsea wants to know, "If a camel's hump is full of water, then what happens when the camel runs out of water? Does its hump look like a balloon that's lost its air?"
K: Chelsea, even a thirsty camel can still have a hump -- as long as the camel isn't hungry, too. Camels store fat in their humps, not water. When a camel goes without food long enough, its hump will shrink and finally disappear!
E: Camels store water in all parts of their bodies, just like you and me, Chelsea. And their bodies are made to hold on to that water. For example, a camel's fur keeps it from sweating too much. Also, camels conserve their water. When they're resting, camels tend to huddle in groups. That's because there's less heat flow between two camels than between a camel and the air -- so less water evaporates!
K: Camels can go for more than half a year in the desert without drinking water. But, a very thirsty camel can slurp up more than enough water to fill up your bathtub!
E: Chelsea, thanks for your question. The National Science Foundation helps make our show possible. You'll hear about everything on the Earth . . .
K: And in the sky . . .
E: On Kids' Earth and Sky!

Author(s): Beverly Wachtel, Marc Airhart, Deborah Byrd

Please let us know what you think!

© 1980 Byrd & Block Communications Inc. Permission to use, copy and distribute these materials without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above copyright notice appear in all copies and the materials are not redistributed for profit.